Baby Daddy Drama

Over the past week I’ve found myself watching a lot of crap TV. I guess that’s what happens when you combine a new mommy with hungry baby and cable television. You see all sorts of stuff at all hours of the day, from documentaries on Benjamin Franklin to reality series like Basketball Wives.

I’ve been particularly obsessed with this show on Vh1 called Dad Camp. The premise of the show is that six soon-to-be baby daddies (and their pregnant teen partners) go through an intense parenting course to learn to become respectable fathers. As part of the coursework, they not only get graded on how well they complete child care exercises (installing a car seat or comforting a crying baby, for example) but they also have to go through therapy with their baby mommas (and sometimes baby mommas’ mommas).

Part of the entertainment of the show is that these dads-to-be are complete disasters. Immature, irresponsible, angry, clueless, and most often jobless, it’s surprising that any of these miscreants would even show up to a show like this, where they are expected to submit to a behavioral overhaul. Point in case is the guy who calls his girlfriend that she’s a “stage five clinger” (bad). Or the guy who makes out with another girl the first night the couple is at Dad Camp (worse).

But for all the daddy drama on the show, the whole idea of dad camp is completely intriguing to me.

For as excited as my husband was about the idea of us having a crumb cruncher to call our own, there were times in my pregnancy where I had to wonder if my husband had any idea of what bringing up baby actually meant.

Part of the disconnect I trace to my husband’s personality. He’s a natural-born extrovert with a sharp wit, a combination that often makes it seem like he doesn’t take much seriously. The other part is that he has been wrapped up in some intense training for the past 14 months, which has kept him a little out of the loop in terms of the day-to-day stuff at home. And then there’s the fact that he’s an only child, so he hasn’t gotten much , if any, practice with babies. (Not that I really know what the hell I’m doing either.)

So, thinking that we (but really more him) needed a crash course in all things babies (I was the one reading the baby books, after all), I signed us up for the birthing class taught by Juliana Parker of Birth-n-Babies. Then on second thought, I also signed us up for her breastfeeding class.

But for as much as we felt like we got our money’s worth out of the classes, I still felt like sometimes he didn’t “get” it. He was definitely excited, but it was like he had no concrete idea of what life was going to be like when our wee one arrived. And it was freaking me out.

Here’s an example: We were invited to a wedding in Hawaii in December. My husband really wanted to go (so did I), especially since I’d never been there. Plus, we had airline vouchers that we could use to book the flight, which was a bonus. But I was stressing over what to do with the baby. We couldn’t drop him off with the grandparents, so what to do? Do we try to upgrade our seats to business class and keep the baby on our lap? Or do I just book a third seat in coach for the bambino?

These are the things that stress mommies like me out, but dad had nothing to say other than to roll his eyes when I told him how expensive flights to Hawaii were (it is Hawaii, after all, it wasn’t going to be cheap). And then he made the fatal mistake of saying, “Does the baby really need his own seat?” (The flight from D.C. to Honolulu is how long?) I won’t share with you my reaction to that.

There were a few other moments like that in the later part of my pregnancy where it was clear that he had no idea how life was going to change. And if I had known about a sleep-away daddy camp, I would’ve had him on the first bus.

Unsure if what I was seeing in my husband was an anomaly or not, I’ve asked a few friends if their husbands were similarly as infuriatingly clueless the first baby around. I’m sure that there are exceptions, but my conclusion is that it’s totally a guy thing.

I talked to a therapist friend of mine about this phenomenon. Her professional take on it was that while mommies-to-be and newbie mommies are so acutely aware of baby–baby is top of mind 24/7–for many newbie daddies, it continues to sort of be “all about them” for awhile even as mommies are doing the hard work of carrying the next generation. And when it’s not, they can sort of act out. They get frustrated, irritated, annoyed, pouty, and sulky about all the things that they suddenly can’t do (or, alternatively, all the things that they now have to do that they don’t want to do) now that baby is in full focus.

So, I asked my therapist friend how long this sort of alternate reality lasts. When do the daddy instincts kick in in full, putting them on the same page as mommies?

Month four. That was her professional opinion as to when men, in general, really start to bond with baby and grow fully into the daddy role. Why month four? She says it’s because by month four baby has started to really respond and interact. Baby smiles, giggles, recognizes the ‘rents, etc.–and dads really connect with that. Those outward expressions serve almost as mini validations of their role and importance in the life of the wee one.

Her theory makes a lot of sense to me, but I wish, as mommies, we didn’t have to wait so long sometimes. And even though I realize that this is part of a natural progression, I still wish there was a baby boot camp that normal first-time dads could go off to for some pre-baby training. I’m talking not only car seat installation and crib construction, but diapering, burping, swaddling, and round-the-clock feedings. If nothing more, it would hopefully give newbie dads a little perspective on everything moms have been stressing about for months while hardly any of it has been more than a fleeting thought in dads’ minds.

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2 Comments

Filed under birthing, daddy care, daily life, education, mommy care, nesting, newbie parents, post-partum, post-pregnancy, pregnancy, Uncategorized

2 responses to “Baby Daddy Drama

  1. First off all, I would have the same worries about the Hawaii trip. You are not alone there!
    Mommies and daddies love their babies differently not more or less but in a different way. I think as a mother you take the brunt of the worrying and planning for future endeavors, babysitting, schools, etc.
    I have found the dad role playing really gets beefed up with the little boys when they join their first little league baseball team or maybe start enjoying the same hobby as their dad. My sister has TWO BOYS and now that they are teenagers she finds herself alone a lot while the boys are gone fishing, hunting, or helping their dad with something outside. As a mom to a boy and a girl I find that living in a boy’s world is a quiet place- not much talking going on there and my son who is 10 pretty much fends for himself.
    My daughter on the other hand is an extension of myself, my shadow, my third arm and seriously if I stop too fast she runs into me! No joking! So when it comes to everything mommy with her I have always been THE parent and I presume that this will continue for as long as she and I are amicable- I hear that teenage girls can be trying ;)…..but as a new mom by best advice is to never ever take on too much always remember your better half and let him be as involved as humanly possible.
    As a control freak Type A personality I have always taken the reigns and did everything for both my kids from changing ALL the diapers, late night feedings, always the one to miss work when they were sick, and the list goes on and on and on. I have often wondered OUT LOUD that just because I was born with “certain female parts” does not make me more qualified to do all of the above with and for my children. But then again, if someone else did it, I am pretty sure my Type A would kick in and I would scrutinize or redo it MY WAY! ha ha!
    So hang in there and know you are not alone…it will get easier and better in time and harder and more complicated in other ways! Being a new parent is touch and go especially with the first one…when the second one gets here it will be like second nature for you both!

    • Thanks, Ashley, for your more seasoned mom perspective. I think my husband would say that he’s been “into it” since Day 1, but like a lot of soon-to-be-moms, I obviously have a bit of a different perspective. I just think it’s interesting how, as you say, mommies and daddies prepare for their kids uniquely. Mommies nest; daddies don’t really. But yet there are things my husband was sort of nuts about. He absolutely wanted to be the one to bring me and baby home from the hospital. (Random.) I also noticed that when he was running errands the day after baby was born, he stopped to buy baby wipes and baby shampoo. Of course, I had these covered possibly weeks before, but it was telling to me. It was very sweet; it was also an indication that things were really just starting to settle in that we were in fact having a baby. /but no doubt my hubster will be up to speed in no time. I personally think he’s going to be floored by how much baby has changed in the weeks he’s been in his final phase of training.

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